Glossary of Common Terms

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Auditory-Verbal Therapy

Auditory-Verbal Therapy facilitates optimal acquisition of spoken language through listening by newborns, infants, toddlers, and young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Auditory-Verbal Therapy promotes early diagnosis, one-on-one therapy, and state-of-the-art audiologic management and technology. Parents and caregivers actively participate in therapy. Through guidance, coaching, and demonstration, parents become the primary facilitators of their child’s spoken language development. Ultimately, parents and caregivers gain confidence that their child can have access to a full range of academic, social, and occupational choices. Auditory-Verbal Therapy must be conducted in adherence to the Principles of LSLS Auditory-Verbal Therapy.
Source: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing


Background Noise

Environmental noise that competes with the main speech signal.
Source: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing


Behavioral Tests

A variety of tests requiring the participant to reliably demonstrate a change in behavior when a sound is heard. The goal is to determine the lowest (softest) intensity level (threshold) at which a child can detect a sound at specific frequencies. These tests can include Behavioral Observation Audiometry (BOA), Visual Reinforcement Audiometry (VRA), Conditioned Play Audiometry (CPA), Conventional Hand Raising, Speech Audiometry, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR), and more.
Source: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing


Bilateral Hearing Loss


Binaural Hearing Aids


Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA)

An alternative to a traditional bone conduction hearing aid, which is held in place by a headband, a BAHA's sound processor is attached to a small titanium fixture that is surgically inserted in the bone behind the ear. Sounds bypass the middle and outer ear and stimulate the inner ear directly through bone conduction.
Source: Elizabeth B. Cole & Carol Flexer 


Bone Conduction

An evaluative measure performed during diagnostic audiologic testing where sound is delivered via a bone oscillator. This technique helps determine whether the hearing loss is conductive or sensorineural. (Contrasts with Air Conduction.)
Source: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing


Cerumen

Also called earwax, is a yellow secretion from glands in the outer ear that keeps the skin of the ear dry and protected from infection.
Source: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing


Child Development Specialist

A child development specialist is someone who works with children, their parents and educators in assessing a child's developmental needs, deficiencies, and goals. Specialists are highly knowledgeable in typical and atypical development, can recognize the symptoms of a developmental issue, and can offer parents and caretakers advice on how to best work with the child to overcome the problem.
Source: Houston Chronicle


Clear Speech

Clear, intelligible speech involves speaking slightly slower, with precise pronunciation, at a little higher volume than normal and, most important, with frequent pauses between key phrases.
Source: Better Hearing Institute