Do This One Thing To Teach Your Baby to Read

By Hearing First Team September 4, 2019

LSL Day by Day | LSL plan

There’s something you can do today and every day to help your baby on their road to reading. Read our blog to learn the one thing that will help you teach your child with hearing loss to read and be on the road to grade-level reading by the third grade!

As crazy as it sounds, there is one easy thing you can do in just minutes a day to get your little one ready for learning and reading on their own in the future. It’s not complicated or time-consuming. You don’t even have to be a trained educator or reading specialist to do it. Can you guess what it is?

Read aloud to your child for 15 minutes every day. It’s that easy. When a parent or caregiver reads to a child regularly, they…

  • Create happy, early memories around reading
  • Build positive emotional associations with books
  • Introduce new vocabulary words in meaningful stories
  • Establish a lifelong habit of daily reading to be carried into adulthood
  • Prepare that child for literacy and school success

The need for reading aloud doesn’t always occur to families until their baby gets older. But it’s important to start reading to your baby from day one! There’s now evidence that reading to newborns and infants is important, and parents should begin reading to babies as soon as possible.

Making time for regular reading will help your child gain important Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) and literacy skills that will pave the way for their success in school and in life.

Watch our new Did You Know video featuring Hearing First CEO, Dr. Teresa Caraway to hear some specific tips to help your child build their literacy skills as you share books with them every day.


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LSL Day by Day | LSL plan

About the Author

Hearing First Team At Hearing First, we want all children to benefit from the availability of newborn hearing screening, the advances in technology, and the early learning services in their communities. We want all children to have the opportunity to take advantage of access to sound – a critical building block for future success.